Models & Pricing

 

Drifter MK2

The Drtifter is and was my classic and most popular bushcraft knife. With the revamping of the design into the MK2 style, there have been some improvements in ergonomics and minor changes to the drop point blade shape. This is a ‘Do All’ heavy use knife. It comes in thickness ranging from 1/8″ to 1/4″, with the most popular being 3/16″
It is avaiable in 80crv2 or 1095, with 80crv2 being 90% of the sales (see steel selection below for more information). The blade length is 4 3/8″, with a height of around 1 5/16″

Depending on blade thickness, it is available in ether a hollow grind, or a shallow Convex grind. This is available as a forged blade, textured, or with a satin hand sanded finish.

It is available with or without the Swedge point.

Pricing starts at $295 with a single color G10 Handle.

 

Ankou
The Ankou is the big brother to the Drifter MK2, it follows similar design aesthetics and features a slightly larger handle, as well as a substantially longer blade, measuring 6 1/4″ in length, and about 1 1/2″ at the tallest portion of the blade.

Before I sat down to design this knife, I asked myself “What knife would I want if all the chips were down. If I needed one knife, and the situation was bad.” The Ankou was the resulting design.

It comes in thickness ranging from 5/32″ to 1/4″, with the most popular being 3/16″

It is avaiable in 80crv2 or 1095, with 80crv2 being 90% of the sales (see steel selection below for more information).

Depending on blade thickness, it is available in ether a hollow grind, or a shallow Convex grind. This is available as a forged blade, textured, or with a satin hand sanded finish.

It is available with or without the Swedge point.

Pricing starts at $365 with a single color G10 Handle.

 

Hunter-Gatherer

This knife was designed to fill many roles, like the Drifter MKII, but with a focus on field dressing, butchering, and other fine tasks. Because of this the blade height is shorter than the Drifter and I recommended that it be made in ether 1/8″ or 3/32″ thickness, with a shallow convex bevel.  This is the knife that I carry and use every day.

It can be made in 80crv2, 1095, 52100, or AEBL. If it will be used for batoning or other heavy use, I recommend 1/8″ 80crv2, and only suggest AEBL if it will be used soly as a hunting knife.

Pricing starts at $365 with a solid color G10, and a single mosaic pin.

 

 

 

Bushcraft-Hunter

This is the baby brother of the Hunter-gatherer. It’s main focus is on field dressing big game, breasting waterfowl, as well as everyday chores – such as cutting rope, opening boxes, etc. It has a shorter blade which will allow you to do some finer work on processing, but does not have the reach of the larger knife to use for boning out big game, though it will still do the task. I reccomend this knife in 3/32″ only, unless you are looking to use it for batoning wood and other heavy chores, then 1/8″ would be a viable option.

It comes in 80crv2, 1095, 52100, and AEBL.

Pricing starts at $325 with a solid color g10, and a single mosaic pin.

 

Kitchen Knives

I have standard patterns for chefs knives which include a 6″ Santoku style, 8″ Euro, and a paring knife. I can also make a variety of other knives, both hidden and full tang. Please contact me for more information.

 

 

Custom

 

There are a plethora of designs that I have made and used over the years, many of which were one off knives. I can make a huge variety of styles, fighters, hunters, survival knives using a variety of techniques. Forging, stock removal, forge welded laminates, patternwelded (Damascus) Hidden tang, full tang, bolsters, metal hardware, muti-piece laminate handles, etc etc. Feel free to contact me about a design that you have in your head, or for a special project. You don’t even need to have a design, just your intended use of the knife would get us going in the right direction. This is where a majority of my work lies, in the custom designed area.

Steel Selection

80crv2
In my opinion, 80crv2 is the best all around steel for what I do. it is extremely durable, but has good edge retention. Corrosion resistance is very good for a carbon steel due to the alloying. It is my most popular steel, and what I use on my personal knife.  It can take a hamon, if that is something that you are interested in.

1095
A common multi use spring steel. It has a higher carbon content than 80crv2, but with less alloying elements. It is a quality steel that has a large following. It will take a fine hamon, and is a good choice for a variety of knives. From kitchen knives to big choppers.

52100
Fantastic edge retention and a fine choice for hunters, small knives, and kitchen knives. It is a “deep hardening” steel which will not take a hamon, but does accept a fine hand rubbed polish.

AEBL
a very good stainless steel. I am working on some testing to see if this steel will prove itself as a “hard use” knife steel. Until that testing is complete, I recommend this for small hunters only. Many people use it with great success, but until I have had sufficient experience using it, I will hold off on endorsing it for “bushcraft” or “survival” knives.